Bills Passed, but More Failed at this Session

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The end is near for this legislative session and while many bills were introduced, more failed.

News 13's Jenna Jackson explains which bills died, and also legislators’ reactions.

While many bills stayed afloat throughout the process, a good number of them sank to the bottom, one of them, the Criminal Justice Reform Bill.

The bill attempted to keep nonviolent offenders out of jail.

Representative Bo Biteman told News 13, “There's a lot of resistance still on you know, philosophically on drug offenses. “

Likewise microbrewery permits passed the house, but they were not considered in the Senate.

Two bills for military spouses failed both- the military spouse hiring preference and anti-discrimination of military spouses.

A bill to make it a felony if you flee or elude police passed the Senate but failed in third reading in the House.

Another, a bill to raise the minimum wage failed in first reading.

Representative Byrd sponsored this one and commented,“I feel it's a moral imperative that we shouldn't be, in 2017 and next year 2018, we should not be paying people 2.15, 5.15 and 7.35 an hour. Any reasonable person will tell you that those are not livable wages.”

A bill to make CPR training a graduation requirement failed third reading in the Senate.

The campus carry bill, which would allow college students in Wyoming to have their concealed gun with them on campus passed the House but failed in the Senate.

Representative Biteman shared, “I thought we had a bill that was good enough to get through, it was a pretty straightforward bill. From talking to others over in the Senate it sounded like we had it but like I said we just came up a little bit short.”

Both Representatives Byrd and Biteman said they'll try their bills again in years to come.

Some other bills that failed included:
• Student Digital Information Privacy.
• Tobacco Tax.
• Severance Tax on Coal.
• Employment Nondiscrimination.



 
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